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There are two types of scrim tape?!



The ceiling is ALMOST done! It feels like it's taken forever; it words it doesn't sound like such a big job "we replaced the bathroom ceiling" but in reality it's been a very time-consuming mucky job which has much more to it than you would imagine. Ultimately, the ceiling is only one small part of our bathroom renovation and we have much much more work ahead of us. The end isn't in sight just yet!

In my last post we had completed putting the plasterboard up, we we had some seriously large gaps in-between some of the boards. I decided to fix this problem by cutting some slithers of plasterboard to fill the gaps. I was a bit concerned that if I were to leave the gaps as they were, the ceiling would be far more likely to cracking. So that's the gap-problem sorted.



Next up, was jointing - I had made a very large delivery in October for different supplies we would need throughout the coming months; part of this delivery was some scrim tape. I didn't do any scrim tape research at the time; scrim tape, was scrim tape, right? Wrong. Turns out there are two different types of scrim tape, the self-sticking sort, and the paper sort. All the videos and tutorials I had watched and read had used the self-sticking type and at this point I didn't know the other even existed.. Until I came to using the scrim tape I had bought. There was no sticky element to it. At first I thought the reel I had bought was a manufacturing error, but it turns out there's a paper scrim tape that doesn't actually 'stick'. This stuff is apparently what the 'pros' use and is much much much harder to use. Or so I learnt.

I totally regret not buying the sticky stuff - this tape was a nightmare to use! The idea is that you applying the jointing filler to the gap first, apply the paper tape onto this, and then fill more jointing filler over the top. Easier said than done, I assure you!

Firstly, to get the scrim tape to stick, you seemed to need to need to add A LOT of jointing filler to the ceiling. Like, more than seemed necessary. Secondly, the paper itself is quite thick and heavy, and unless you cut off small amounts at a time, the paper continuously seemed to roll off the ceiling. Thirdly, if there isn't enough filler under the paper, or the paper isn't pressed down firmly enough, bubbles would appear under the paper. Pain.In.The.God.Damn.Arse! I found this stuff really really tricky to work with. Given the opportunity to switch the tape, I really would have done.

I actually had to go back over the tape the next day and cut a load of bubbles out and then re-fill. Ideally I should have done this the same day before the filler had set, but quite frankly, I'd had enough of this stuff for one day! Total.Pain! On further research after I had done the job, some people had suggested wetting the scrim tape first to give it greater sticking-ability. I wish I had tried this. But alas, I got there in the end. I sanded it all down the next day, and at long last we're ready for plastering! Although I think we're going to do this a little later in the renovation.

But I can very nearly almost tick the ceiling work off our to-do list! Hurrah!




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