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Plasterboarding with Moisture Resistant Plasterboard

It's finally happened - we put up a ceiling! We've had three huge plasterboard sheets sat in our hallway for about a month and now they are finaaally in place! We've never plastered or plaster-boarded before, so again this was a complete first for us. We already prepped the ceiling, which you can see in my last post here, so we were now ready to cut and fit the plasterboard. The plasterboard I chose is a moisture-resistant one, which you can recognise by the green finish on it. These are quite a bit pricier than your standard plasterboard; by comparison they cost an additional £5 per board at a whopping £13 per board. Luckily we only needed 3 though.

I'm not going to lie, if you're looking for a DIY how-to for a professional plasterboarding finish, stop reading now. This is without a doubt, one of our more sloppier pieces of DIY. But I guess that's the thing about doing it all yourself, you're not a professional, and DIY-firsts aren't going to look professional. So, yeah, prepare to go "well that doesn't look done very well". But hey, as long as it holds up, we can fix the finish later.

Cutting plasterboard is one of the more easier parts to this job; it only requires three easy steps, with just the use of a regular stanley knife...
1. Draw a line where you want to cut, and cut through the board, but only about 1/3 deep.
2. Push the board away from you and it'll snap at the cut.
3. Cut the paper on the back along the already cut line, and you're done.



The more difficult part of this job is getting the actual plasterboard up onto the ceiling. Depending on the size of the board, these can be preeeetttyy heavy and awkward! You can buy these clamp hangers or these support clamps which are ideal helpers for hanging plasterboard, but they are both quite pricey, so we opted for another method - A two-man lifting job. OK, one man, one woman lifting job.  OK, maybe just a one man lifting job (a girl can try!). Grant held the plasterboard against the ceiling with man power alone whilst I screwed it into the joists. Biggest problem with this plan was that we only had one set of ladders, and not only was it mega awkward, it was hugely impractical as we were pretty much constantly in each others way, unable to move and we were basically ready to plummet to our deaths by falling off the rickety old wooden ladder. So, that didn't work. I whipped out the interwebs and had a quick research and then suggested we made our own lifting tool which I had discovered others had done. So, here it is...


We used two lengths of wood we had spare around the house and fastened them together so the length was just slightly longer than the length of the floor to ceiling. We then fastened another piece of wood across the top to create a 'T' formation. This tool then acts as a wedge between the plasterboard and the floor, propping it up without being screwed into the joists, like such..



This idea worked MUCH better. Don't get me wrong, it was still slightly awkward. Perhaps because I couldn't work out the correct angles in which to wedge it into place, but it was definitely much safer and less work too, although Grant did still have to lift the plasterboard up to get it into place before we could wedge it. I recommend cutting the plasterboard to smaller lengths so that they weigh less!

Screwing the plasterboard into place was easy peasy from here onwards. You want to leave a small gap, around 3mm thick between each board when fitting them together, although some of ours are quite laaaarge gaps, I'm hoping this won't cause us too much of a problem (famous last words). We also had to drill holes in the board for both the light and the light switch, and then also cut out a hole for the extractor fan ducting. We used a stanley jabsaw for this, which cut through the board really well. And ta-dah! One fully plasterboarded ceiling, if a little wonky, with large gaps...



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