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Filling that Gap between the Ceiling and Wall

Because we decided to so boldly remove the thick lath and plaster ceiling in the bathroom and replace it with a modern plaster-boarding approach, it meant we gained height in the ceiling. Only a few centimetres, mind. But what that now meant, was that the plaster on the walls no longer met up with the new ceiling, leaving this gap all the way around the room.



So our next job was to tackle this gap and make it look part of the original plaster as if there has never been a gap. The biggest problem really was making it look neat and angular when it met the ceiling and not a wibbly-wobbly mess. Initially I purchased some angle beads that are designed exactly for this kind of job. However, upon bringing them home I realised they were far too large to fit in the gap, and if I were to use them I would in fact have to skim the walls too, or otherwise have a bulge at the top of the wall where the metal would stick out. So with that idea scrapped, I decide to free-hand it and attempt to create a corner without any 'corner aids'. My convincing argument for this idea was that older houses never have perfect corners anyway, so it wouldn't look too out of place as long as I didn't get it too wrong.

For the job I used an undercoating plaster.. partly because it's ideal for going onto brick, but also because it was reduced to £2(!!) in our local Homebase. What a bargain! Not having a measuring jug, I just eyeballed the mix to what I thought seemed about right; probably not recommended for someone who has never used plaster before, but hey ho. I then used a pointing tool (again, probably not most ideal... You may begin to see a trend here) and a filling knife to push the plaster into the gap and smooth it out as best I could, particularly making sure not to fill the gap completely flush with the rest of the plaster, as this is what the top coat will be fore. I also took extra care in making sure to scrape off any excess that may show up on the existing plastered wall and ceiling.

After about an hour and a half, I went back over what I had done and created a criss-cross pattern with the knife. This will help the top coat to 'stick' to it.





Surprisingly, the more I filled, the easier it became and creating a corner free-hand wasn't so difficult after all. I think I got it looking pretty darn spot-on, if I do say so myself. The hardest part was above the window where there was an extra large gap where we had installed the extractor fan ducting. Because there was no brick here, I used some expanding foam, to give the plaster something to adhere to.

For the top coat I used a jointing filler which has the consistency of a very thick polyfiller. I purchased this as the name suggests to fill the joints in-between the plasterboards, however to save on money I'm also going to use this for a top-coat over the plaster. My main reason for using this, was that as you're able to sand this stuff, I would hopefully get a pretty smooth finish against the existing plaster. If I had used a top-coat plaster, which is much thicker and unsandable, it would have been much harder to get a perfect smooth finish between the two plasters. I was a little unsure whether I had made the right decision, but having completed the job, I'm thrilled with how it turned out. I think once it's painted you would never know that that had ever been a gap between the wall and ceiling. Perhaps I've found my forte ;) I also love this part of DIY as it's something I can do on my own which doesn't require help, meaning I don't have wait impatiently for Grants days off to get stuff done. And I quite enjoy it too!




Whilst this wasn't a huge job, it has actually made a huge difference to the room. There's something about covering up the exposed brick and having the walls complete again that has re-made this room. Installing the ceiling gave a lid to the room again, but covering up this gap is almost like pushing the lid on properly. It feels like a room again. It feels complete. Okay, not totally complete, but we're certainly getting there.

1 comment

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